MEET PROF. RICHARD KREVOLIN

image001A little background before the interview, so you can get to know Prof. Richard Krevolin. Richard attended Yale University earning an Undergraduate Degree in History. He earned a Master’s Degree in Screenwriting at UCLA’s School of Cinema-Television and a Master’s Degree in Playwriting and Fiction from USC. He has been Adjunct Professor at USC Cinema/TV school, UCLA Film School, Emerson College, Ithaca College , Pepperdine and UGA. He has authored Screenwriting in the Land of Oz (Adams Media), Screenwriting from the Soul (St. Martin’s Press), Pilot Your LIfe (Prentice-Hall), How To Adapt Anything into A Screenplay (Wiley & Sons), and The Transcript (A story about reclaiming the potential of your business by using the three-step MAPP process.)  He is also the author of the Young Adult book series, Tales of the Truly Grotesque, Max Holt, Ultra-Mega-Super-Secret–Boy and Doug P Mountain Dog and The Golden Bone. His consulting work has affected hundreds of TV commercials produced all over the world winning the Golden Lions at Cannes and The People Choice Award in China. He conducts writer’s workshops and corporate storytelling seminars throughout the world.

I could go on and on, but then the interview would never get done. Please check online for all of his accomplishments. NOW THE INTERVIEW:

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WRITING?

Since I can remember. I actually found an old Abbot and Costello script that I wrote when in the fourth grade. That’s going way back.

WHAT ATTRACTED YOU TO WRITING?

The glamorous lifestyle 🙂

HOW ARE YOU ABLE TO SWITCH FROM NOVEL, TO NON-FICTION, TO SCREENWRITING, AND PLAY WRITING?

It’s refreshing to switch genres, and I think it makes me a better writer.

HOW DO IDEAS FOR ALL OF YOUR WRITING COME TO YOU?

Every which way. Things I see and hear. Conversations I have. Things I read. Dreams, Fantasies, Mostly from my day-to-day interactions with people and literature.

HOW DO YOU FIGURE OUT WHAT TO NAME YOUR CHARACTERS?

I listen to the sound of the letters together in the name and see if that sounds feels right for that person.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT WRITING?

I love those timeless moments when the writing pours out of you and the pages flow onto the computer, and not have a real job.

WHAT IS YOUR LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT WRITING?

The days it doesn’t flow.

HOW DO YOU RESPOND TO A NEGATIVE REVIEW?

I go work out and vow never to read reviews again.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE QUOTE?

Passion, patience, and perseverance – – that is all.

WHEN YOUR NOVEL, SCREENPLAY OF PLAY GETS PUBLISHED, WHO WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE AS THE HEROINE AND HERO?

Depends on the piece. But in the end, the writer doesn’t have a say in this.

IF YOU COULD LIVE ONE OF THE STORIES OF A BOOK YOU’VE READ, WHICH ONE AND WHY?

I love THE GAME OF THRONES, series, but wouldn’t want to live in that world; instead would probably want to be Harry Potter. Who wouldn’t?

DO YOU HAVE AN ODD QUIRK THAT IS NOT KNOW OR KNOWN BY A FEW?

I get paid by the hour to work in bed. THAT IS…I write and consult on my laptop and my bedroom is my office.

THE LAST QUESTION, PROMISE, WHAT IS STORY CONSULTING?

I am not an editor. I work with writers to develop their stories. I work with writers on growing their stories and in doing so, they also grow as writers. It is an amazing process and I am happy being a part of this.

Thanks, Richard. I appreciate your time and thoughts. Hope to see you again in Atlanta.

For all readers, this is only a small part of the Professor. Go to his website: http://www.profk.com. and check out opportunities for you, your writing, and your stories.

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RESEARCH – Digging In For Results

images_006How do you research information for your novel? This one word covers a lot of territory. Let’s begin with a thought.

You have pictures playing in your mind. You see a movie with your characters running wild, but who are they? Where are they? Are they from the modern era or do you notice a difference in their clothing? Are they running to or away from someone or something? Will this new novel be a work of fiction or non-fiction. You stop and look at all the scribbles on the sheet of paper beside you. Where to start?

FICTION:  Start with the research of your settings/locations. If you are writing a fiction novel, you need to decide about the genre. Do you want the novel to take place in a well-known city? If you are writing historical romance, you need to research the area you want to place your characters. How about a science-fiction or future adventure? These require different research material.

Some writers/authors travel to the setting they want to use. Each street name, location of a certain store, building, or highway must be accurate. One of your first readers may be from the area you use. One mistake and credibility is out the front door. Even if you lived there, at some point in time, things change. Do your research online, at the library, write to the City Chamber of Commerce for information and brochures. Check with the state for current information. You can never have enough notes. Then your job becomes harder to separate what you want to use or discard. Just be certain to keep all your notes.

If you want to make up your setting for a fiction work, you can do this. You love the area and state of XXXX. This would be a great place to have a suspense, thriller, complete with a love triangle. You still have to research online about the state and all of its components. The research is the same, except you get to make up your city. Check and recheck city names within the state you want to use. You cannot have duplications. You can even make up a name for your fiction city, as long as nothing like it exists in the state records. This is the fun part. It is your fiction city to do with what you please, within reason. You need to make this city real and a place someone would want to live, work, play, and . . .”

Oh, you want to write a paranormal or sci-fi novel. Research is still the only way to get your setting in place for your story. Read other works. Watch movies, both old and new, and television shows. Take good notes on everything you read or see. Be certain your language fits. You will need to research the vocabulary used between the characters and whatever they are flying in, from or to.

NON-FICTION:  This requires the same tedious research. Accurate settings and information is an absolute. You are aware of your character(s), but what about the time period? Check libraries for picture details in the period. Go online and Google the dates you need, say 1800’s, and gather information on clothing, music, homes, work, politics, or whatever else you may need. Then gather information on your character(s). If you have a personal reference, be certain to take good notes and keep them in order. If this non-fiction work turns into a memoir, check the legalities in using names, places and events. Always double-check your information when a family member tells you events. You need to know if the events happened in a specific way or how the person remembers the events. The difference here is truth vs. memories.

Research is tedious work. As a writer, you will gain knowledge and expand your characters’ lives. Your stories will come alive for your readers. This is what authors want.

Happy Research.