CHARACTERS

Where do you get your characters for your stories? Sometimes, they are just in our head and as we begin to write, they emerge into a scene. Then you get this idea and the character will not appear. No matter what you think, scribble down, or hit the keys, the character stays hidden. Characters, like life, are fickle to our stories and just do not behave the way we think they should. Of course, not. This is the reason we have characters.

Characters need to have a will of their own. They are often complicated with hope, fears, and dreams and at times contrary to what writers want them to do. Have you ever started your story with a sweet character who turns into a person you do not know? Your character is showing volition and this is what you want.

Your characters need complications to overcome. They need to be full of life, powerful, and have potential and appeal. Also, they need to show a softer side in some scenes and give the reader a chance to observe their different sides. If your character or characters do the same thing over and over, you are not giving your reader an incentive to read more pages.

How your characters dress, their age, their mannerisms relate to the reader. Put a spark of imagination in their attitudes and see what changes they can create in your story. What about their names? This can say much about your character. Odd names can remain in your reader’s mind for a long time. Just make certain this name fits your character.  This brings up the use of ‘nicknames’ for your character. Do you use them?  If you do, make it a name to remember for your character. We are not talking about a William to Billy, or a Harold to Hal and then on the female side, an Elizabeth to Betty, or Suzanne to Suzie. You need to stop and listen. If the name does not fit, your characters will not act the same.

Then your character is in the reader’s mind and emotion as the story moves forward. Are your characters friendly? If so, your reader will relate to the character. If your characters are cold or standoffs, your reader will not relate or even suspect this character of being rude throughout the book. How your characters come across to your reader is an important, if not the most important, connection of the reader and the story.

Play with names, mannerisms, age, and let your characters be themselves. They will come forward and liven up your story in the most unusual ways. Let your characters work for you and enjoy your writing.

HAPPY DAY.  HAPPY WRITING.

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